times-square-3

New York to Montreal via the Adirondacks

Autumn in New York and New England were on our globe trotting list so when our son went to Vancouver Canada for an indefinite stay, we decided to pay him a visit…in autumn. But, since flying out of Australia beyond the Asia Pacific region is a long haul we always make the most of a trip by visiting as many places as we possibly can. For this journey, it was an opportunity to revisit New York and to savour outstanding cuisine. It was also a perfectly good excuse to see the autumn foliage in the New England coastline before we make our way to Vancouver in the west Coast of Canada. As if these were not enough, it was a perfect time to satisfy our interest to try the Adirondack (Amtrak) service from New York to Montreal where we would board a Seabourn cruise bound for ports of interest in Eastern Canada, the east coast of USA- New England then Charleston and Florida. A ridiculously long way to get to Vancouver, but why not? So, from Australia, the first stop was New York.

During our last trip to New York, Central Park was knee deep in snow. It was a magical sight! At the time, my husband was in New York on business but we managed to include the usual sightseeing around Lower Manhattan and Wall Street, Battery Park and Staten Island, Tribeca and Little Italy. This time around, we wanted to see Central Park in autumn and enjoy the cool weather, that nip in the air conducive to sightseeing on foot and see the fabulous landscape and colours associated with autumn leaves…red, gold, orange. New York is always an exciting place to visit. So much to see and do but if a traveller only has a few days like we did, it’s best to plan and prioritise. On this trip, other than a stroll to Central park, we chose to explore the streets around the Upper East Side, Midtown and to visit a couple of our favourite galleries and museum.

Central Park is huge…more than 750 acres of urban garden, the first landscaped park in the USA, and an oasis in a concrete jungle right smack in the middle of upper Manhattan. In the 19th century, thanks to the wealthy merchants and residents of New York who agitated for the state government to allocate land to create a park, a place of recreation for the public was designed. It was at the time, America’s answer to the gardens in Paris, London and other European cities. There are different ways to see and explore the park. On our first day, we devoted time to walk from the south entrance and see specific sights right up to the eastern side, the middle and the west. Having said that, there were many tourists who chose to cycle (rent a bike) hire a pedicab tour or take the horse drawn carriage. Of particular interest to us were the Bethesda Fountain and Terrace, the Obelisk, Conservatory Pond, Belvedere lake and Castle (mid –park) and up the northern end, the Harlem Meer and the picturesque Huddlestone Arch.

Central Park NY
Central Park NY
Central Park NY
Central Park NY
Central Park NY
Central Park NY

It took us nearly the entire day to enjoy the park but we still had time to have a quick look at the exterior of The Guggenheim museum on our stroll back along 5th avenue (corner 89th). The interesting cylindrical building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is now on our ‘must visit’ place for the next New York visit; one that will be exclusively for a trip to galleries and museums that dot Manhattan’s streets.

A visit to New York has to include a stop at the iconic Grand Central Station, regarded as the busiest rail terminal in the world. Built in 1871 this engineering and architectural marvel is linked to 19th century legendary American rail and shipping magnate, Cornelius Vanderbilt. The New York Times has a very interesting YouTube video video about the Grand Central and its secrets.

Grand Central Station NY
Grand Central Station NY
Grand Central Station NY
Grand Central Station NY
Grand Central Station NY

Not only is this building one of New York’s famous landmarks, it is also where one of New York’s older culinary establishments is located (at the basement). Fondly known as The Oyster Bar, we think of this restaurant as the place to go to for some of the freshest and succulent seafood. I sort of knew that oysters were associated with ‘New York food’ along with hotdogs, pretzels and the like but it wasn’t until I saw an image at the New York public library that I was educated about the history of oysters as a staple in New York eateries. According to food historians, this was the case even as early as when the Europeans settled after Henry Hudson sailed into the Hudson river. In fact, even before the Europeans came, the Indians were already harvesting and shucking oysters which were abundant. Oysters were plentiful in the lower Hudson estuary and the waters around Ellis and Liberty islands. In time, enterprising colonists opened up what they called the oyster cellars which became commonplace in the city’s early history. The rich supply of oysters at the time meant that even those who were not wealthy could afford to have the large and succulent New York oysters from street vendors. These were consumed in the streets just like one does these days with hotdogs. According to a former New York Times restaurant critic William Grimes, oysters were regular and common ingredients to New York food. His book, Appetite City: A Culinary History of New York is a fascinating read for foodies. It was with oysters in mind that we had dinner at The Oyster Bar. Not only does this celebrated restaurant have an interesting menu of raw and a variety of cooked oysters, there are options of other seafood and non-seafood meals as well. The Oyster Bar was established in 1913 in the lower concourse of Grand Central station and has become a New York attraction since then. We think it is a fine testament to New York’s early culinary history.

The Oyster Bar - Grand Central Station
The Oyster Bar - Grand Central Station
The Oyster Bar - Grand Central Station

Celebrity travel writer, Paul Theroux said that travellers (as opposed to tourists) ‘observe’. On every journey, we are by definition ‘tourists’ trying to cram as many things to do, see and experience. However, we do try and make every effort to observe and engage other travellers and locals, simply because we learn from them. We found that by doing so , we are guaranteed to have travel experiences that are more enjoyable and unforgettable. At our dinner at The Oyster Bar, the waiter entertained and educated us with tidbits, trivia and facts about the restaurant, its history and the food we ordered. Next to our table, dining by herself was an elegantly dressed lady, an obvious regular client at The Oyster Bar. We initiated a conversation with her, seeing she was dining alone. We had a most interesting and informative evening as it turned out that she was a former resident of New York. She gave us plenty of advice to chew on for our next intended visit to New York; the one which will focus on galleries and museums. As it turned out, she is heavily involved with the arts herself and was in New York City for a few days to attend gallery function and exhibits.

Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant
Location: Grand Central Terminal
Address: 89 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017, United States
Phone:+1 212-490-6650
Hours: Monday to Saturday 11;30 a.m. to 9:30 pm
Sunday and major holidays: Closed

MOMA (Museum of Modern Art) was the next on our list for this trip. A walking distance from our hotel in upper Manhattan, it is located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Established in 1929, MOMA has almost 200,000 works of art from around the world; Picasso, Calo, Warhol, Dali… some obscure, most are by famous artists.The list goes on and on. One needs a day to explore the extensive collection and exhibition of modern art expressed in various mediums. Even then, it won’t be a comprehensive viewing. There is so much to see it warrants another visit.
Address: 11 W 53rd St, New York
Hours: Daily from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30

A leisurely stroll to explore Midtown was invigorating. New York has a unique and exhilarating energy, which is contagious. We could have just kept on walking, absorbing, observing and admiring buildings, monuments and surrounds. A stop at Bryant Garden behind the Public Library took us to the Bryant Park Grill, a charming Parisian style bistro set in the middle of one of Manhattan’s beautiful gardens. Resting our weary feet we could only have drinks enjoyed at their rooftop as we already have made dinner reservations at the Red Eye Grill, across Carnegie Hall. A pity, because a glance at their menu promised what I’m sure would be delicious options of good modern American cuisine. One can choose casual dining in the alfresco setting and the Grill for a more formal dinner.

Bryant Garden
Bryant Garden

New York is a major point of entry for immigrants. Haven’t we all seen and know of the statue of Liberty, an enduring symbol of welcome to those who fled their countries and seek freedom from oppression? A quote from Emma Lazarus ‘poem, The New Colossus, associated with the statue of Liberty- “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free” – says it all. Consequently, New York is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in America. From its early beginnings as a Dutch enclave, early European colonists populated New York but in the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century, the Irish, Germans, Russians, many South East Asians, Central Americans and Caribbean came to America via New York and stayed there to call it home. Can you imagine then the variety of food that has since evolved and are identified with New York? The city’s cuisine is so varied and speaks of its rich history. One can find the ethnic influence on street food (stands or trucks serving tacos, hot dogs to name a few), bakeries and delis (bagels, pretzels, pastrami in Reuben sandwiches) diners (clam chowder, Waldorf salad) and yes, restaurants such as The Oyster Bar and the Grill at Bryant Park…both have food in their menu that speak of the layers of flavours influenced by New York’s multi ethnic population.

Our last meal in New York was at the Red Eye Grill, a buzzing and hip restaurant located at 890, 7Th Avenue. Needless to say, the offerings were varied, from seafood, steak and a very modern fusion American cuisine; the restaurant also has a sushi and oyster bar. Surely this has to be indication of the varied mix of cuisine in New York? We had a thoroughly fun evening served by very able hostesses and the live band providing the right mood.

Ending our last night in New York was a stroll back to Midtown to join the hundreds of tourists and pedestrians milling around Times Square. Renowned as the place to be on New Year’s Eve to witness the ‘ball drop’ from the roof of the old New York Times building (now known as One Times Square) this junction between Broadway and Seventh Avenue attract as many as an estimated 50 million tourists every year. The best time to visit Times Square is at night when, as you can imagine, brightly coloured billboards and other outdoor advertising are lit up and street performers and buskers entertain the visitors. Every night, Times Square being the hub of the Broadway theatre district is alive and buzzing and for the tourists, visitors and residents alike there’s a myriad of entertain options. It’s one big party!

Times Square
Times Square
Times Square
Times Square
Times Square
Times Square
Times Square
Times Square

Although excited to move on, we were hesitant to leave New York but Eastern Canada beckoned. The next morning we dutifully boarded the Amtrak Adirondack service for Montreal at Penn station.